So what is Networked Learning?

thUTCp30UTC11bUTCSun, 11 Nov 2007 23:54:25 +0000 13, 2007

EXAM QUESTION 2

Filed under: Uncategorized — melanie1987 @ 9:53p11

Question 2

When discussing the role collaboration and constructivism has within education, I feel the following image is paramount:

We are all spiders working together to create a huge web of information- we are all contributing, sharing and collaborating togetheron the platform of WEB2.0.  

“A social constructivist learning approach” has been proposed as a way to think about learning using social networking technologies (hardware and software). Connectivism and Constructivist Learning have also been proposed as a way to provide a theoretical basis for online learning.

 “Constructivism does not claim to have made earth-shaking inventions in the area of education; it merely claims to provide a solid conceptual basis for some of the things that, until now, inspired teachers had to do without theoretical foundation.” – von Glasersfeld

 [flashvideo width=”425″ height=”350″ filename=”http://www.teachertube.com/flvideo/6042.flv” /]

So the first question that arises is what is meant by constructivism? The term refers to the idea that learners construct knowledge for themselves—each learner individually (and socially) constructs meaning—as he or she learns. Constructing meaning is learning; there is no other kind. Therefore we have to focus on the learner in thinking about learning (not on the subject/lesson to be taught) and there is no knowledge independent of the meaning attributed to experience (constructed) by the learner, or community of learners.There are two main subsets of research that the constructivist approach to teaching and learning is based on; they are cognitive psychology and social psychology. Piaget (1972) is considered as one of the chief theorists among the cognitive constructivists, while Vygotsky (1978) is the major theorist among the social constructivists.  Secondly what is Connectivism and how can it be used in education?

 

When discussing the uses of Web 2.0 in the classroom, it is important to note that the theory of connectivism is being applied. Connectivism ‘ is the integration of principles explored by chaos, network, and complexity and self-organization theories’ (Siemans, 2004). This includes understanding that Web 2.0 is constantly changing and being developed and strategies must be worked on to ensure students are receiving the most up to date educational tools available to them over the internet.

 George Siemens can be heard here talking about Connectivism and its implications for education:
http://www.elearnspace.org/media/Connectivism_IOC/player.html 
 

Learning and teaching in the classroom is becoming increasingly easier due to the influx of many new technologies and a myriad of software. Web 2.0 is seen as the new and improved, second generation of internet usage; Web 1.0 is the first generation. No longer is web work based upon getting information form the web; now Web 2.0 is about constructing knowledge collaboratively on the web. Web 2.0 is engaging and active compared to the passive and un-engaging Web 1.0 applications- ideal for the digital classroom. Made possible through advancements in technology, Web 2.0 applications (Facebook, MySpace, Blogs, Wiki’s, iGoogle, Flickr, RSS Feeds and YouTube. Etc) are effective teaching and pedagogical tools. These provide a platform for social networking through a medium that allows for sharing, informing, communicating and interacting. Having experienced a semester of learning in the Web 2.0 environment and being involved in learning using these methodologies, I see there are several key issues for teachers in the following areas: 

A.     The way in which the teacher conveys new information

Constructivist teaching is based on the constructivist learning theory, which holds that learning should build upon knowledge that a student already has, and that learning is more effective when a student is actively involved in the construction of knowledge, rather than when he/she is passively listening to a lecture. Thus, the learners give meaning to the knowledge based on their personal experiences. Characteristics of Constructivist TeachingOne of the primary goals of using constructivist teaching is that students learn how to learn by giving them the training to take initiative for their learning experiences.According to Audrey Gray, the characteristics of a constructivist classroom are as follows:

  • *       the learners are actively involved

  • *       the environment is democratic

  • *       the activities are interactive and student-centered

  • *       the teacher facilitates a process of learning in which students are encouraged to be responsible and autonomous

In the constructivist classroom, the teacher’s role is to prompt and facilitate discussion. Thus, the teacher’s main focus should be on guiding students by asking questions that will lead them to develop their own conclusions on the subject.With Web 2.0 technologies, the teacher must LEAD by example, and not resort back to BOSS principles.(Glasser) 

  

B.     The encouragement of collaboration among students

“The quest for knowledge is the result of innate curiosity in everyone. Find a way to nurture this drive in children, and they will consume knowledge as thirsty person drinks water.” –Greg Henry Quinn, 365 Meditations

collaborating around the world

Web 2.0 plays a significant role in promoting cognitive learning principles in the classrooms. Cognitive theorists such as Piaget emphasised active problem solving and meaning-making on the part of the learner. Piaget and Vygotsky pointed out the importance of social interaction in learning. One of the key characteristics of Web 2.0 is collaboration, both between machine and user, and between several users. These applications have the capacity to function as ‘intellectual partners’ to promote critical thinking and higher order cognitive processing (Voithofer, 2007). Text, voice, music, graphics, photos, animation and video are combined to promote thinking and encourage learners to accomplish creative, higher-level tasks. They provide a range of resources for students to use in problem solving, thinking, reflecting and collaborating with others within physical classrooms and across the globe in virtual learning contexts.  It is also argued that Web 2.0 technologies, with their potential for interactivity, are more conducive to active and engage learning than more traditional-centred approaches. According to its advocates, the constructivist classroom that integrates Web 2.0 provides students with a ‘complex laboratory in which to observe, question, practise and validate knowledge’ (Dillon, 2004). In such classrooms, the emphasis is on learning with, not from or about, Web 2.0. Collaboration among learners is another defining characteristic of constructivist classrooms (Jonassen, 1994). Web 2.0 has strong potential for social interactivity and for supporting collaboration and student-centred learning. For example, it is possible for virtual communities of learners on the internet to work in small collaborative groups to achieve a common goal; this is achieved through the implementation of a wiki. The heterogeneous grouping of learners around computer based tasks can assist in creating zones of proximal development and be beneficial for all students (Vygotsky, 1934). Such Web 2.0 technologies (facebook, myspace, wikis) provide opportunities for students to build shared meaning (Dillon, 2004).  

Humans are social beings with an innate desire to belong, so teachers need to structure their WEB2.0 application and lessons around this fundamental need.(Dreikurs)

Coming together is a beginning;
keeping together is progress;
Working together is success.
Anonymous
 

 C.     Classroom management Methods

 

Students who sit in boring classes where their brains are screaming out for stimulation and dying from tedium will create their own stimuli. That’s when the spit balls will start flying, the bits of rubber will be flicked around the room, the notes will be passed and interference with other students will begin to occur. To harness this creativity and collaboration teachers need to get on board with the digital classroom and implement Web 2.0 applications. This new technology allows for a more open and collaborative classroom where communication, learning and creativity occur.The use of ICT in classrooms has been found to enhance motivation and self-esteem; this can be put down to the active engagement of learners, where self-regulation and control over learning are encouraged by the teacher, peers (and parents). This ‘non-intervention’ process allows learning to occur naturally and progressively through co-operation, and is modelled upon Glasser ‘s(1992) and Roger’s (1989)model of classroom management where students need area met and good behaviour ensues – a need for belonging, power, freedom, fun. All these ‘basic needs’ are addressed throughout Web 2.0 applications where the children have ‘responsibility and self-direction’ of their self- constructed (fun) learning (Glasser, 1992). 

Glasser “We almost always have choices, and the better the choice, the more we will be in control of our lives.”  GlasserThus William Glasser espoused that good behavior comes from good choices and that all behaviours, both positive and negative, are purposeful communication. Glasser believed that by listening to student’s misbeaviours, we could arrive at an understanding of the student that would improve communication. A central tenant of Glasser’s Choice Theory is the belief that we are internally, not externally motivated. According to Glasser, we are driven by five genetic needs: survival, love and belonging, power, freedom, and fun. Glasser’s ‘hierarchy of needs’ is a useful starting point for thinking about what may be motivating student’s behaviour, also leading us to look at what is happening in the classroom rather than at the individual student’s behaviour. Motivation in education and student behaviour will come about through altering the way classrooms function instead of trying to change the students’ behaviour. Lessons can potentially become boring if students are not engaged and at the same time expected not to misbehave. Glasser says this is like asking someone who is standing on hot tar to stand still and stop complaining. Glasser suggests that a key way of changing this traditional classroom function is to move away from “boss” teaching to “lead” teaching. I believe this will activate a positive learning environment, giving students much more independence, responsibility and choice about the things they do (eg what and how they study).

DreikursRudolf Dreikurs main focus is on establishing a classroom which is democratic in nature and gives students a sense of belonging. This is put in place when students have some voice as to the functions, purpose and tasks of the classroom. Mutual trust between the teacher and students is therefore required.

Dreikurs maintains that “discipline makes no use of punishment.” He further believes that students have different levels of misbehavior. These misbehaviors occur in a progressive manner. The child first tries to get attention. If this does not work, the child will misbehave further in an effort to achieve power over the teacher or others. When attention or power do not gain the student sufficient status, they seek revenge. They believe they can only feel significant if they hurt others. After all else fails, the student then displays inadequacy. This is also called “learned helplessness.” The student sees themselves as a complete failure. They feel others will leave them alone if others see them as inadequate.
Helping students to find legitimate ways to satisfy their needs can terminate inappropriate behaviour:

·        Attract attention – People by their very nature are social beings with an innate desire to belong.

·        Exercise power

·        Exact revenge

·        Display inadequacy

Dreikurs model is an ideal one for enhancing student empowerment.

youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sUTlFtaqzCQ  

 D.     Ensuring that learning occurs at Bloom’s higher levels

The mind is not a vessel to be filled, but a fire to be ignited. (Plutarch) 

By implementing Bloom’s taxonomy within the learning process of Web 2.0 technologies the teacher is able to ensure that learning occurs at a higher level.Bloom’s Taxonomy is a classification of thinking organised by level of complexity. It gives teachers and students an opportunity to learn and practice a range of thinking and provides a simple structure for many different kinds of questions and thinking. Typically a teacher would vary the level of questions within a single lesson – aiming towards higher-order thinking. This questioning should be used purposefully to achieve well-defines goals.Emphasis is placed upon its use as a “more authentic tool for curriculum planning, instructional delivery and assessment” (oz-TeacherNet, 2001). 

1.                   REMEMBERING: The learner is able to recall, restate and remember learned information.

 2.                  UNDERSTANDING: The learner grasps the meaning of information by interpreting and translating what has been learned.

3.                  APPLYING: The learner makes use of information in a context different from the one in which it was learned.

4.                  ANALYSING: The learner breaks learned information into its parts to best understand that information.

5.                  EVALUATING: The learner makes decisions based on in-depth reflection, criticism and assessment.

6.                  CREATING: The learner creates new ideas and information using what has been previously learned.

Higher level questions are those requiring complex application, analysis, evaluation or creation skills. Questions at higher levels of the taxonomy are usually most appropriate for:

                      Encouraging students to think more deeply and critically

                      Problem solving

                      Encouraging discussions

                      Stimulating students to seek information on their own  

The role of the teacher and the students also varies within the classroom when Higher-Order thinking and a deeper Surface learning is underway. For instance:

Remembering: Classroom Roles for Remembering

TEACHERS ROLE STUDENTS ROLE
                      Directs                      Tells                      Shows                      Examines                      Questions                      Evaluates                         Responds                      Absorbs                      Remembers                      Recognises                       Memorises                       Defines                      Describes                      Retells                      Passive recipient

 Understanding: Classroom Roles for Understanding

TEACHERS ROLE STUDENTS ROLE
                      Demonstrates                      Listens                      Questions                      Compares                      Contrasts                      Examines                          Explains                      Describes                      Outlines                      Restates                      Translates                      Demonstrates                      Interprets                      Active participant

 Applying: Classroom Roles for Applying

TEACHERS ROLE STUDENTS ROLE
                      Shows                      Facilitates                      Observes                      Evaluates                      Organises                       Questions                           Solves problems                      Demonstrates use of knowledge                      Calculates                      Compiles                      Completes                      Illustrates                       Constructs                       Active recipient

  Analysing: Classroom Roles for Analysing

TEACHERS ROLE STUDENTS ROLE
                      Probes                      Guides                      Observes                      Evaluates                      Acts as a resource                      Questions                      Organises                       Dissects                        Discusses                      Uncovers                      Argues                      Debates                      Thinks deeply                      Tests                      Examines                      Questions                      Calculates                      Investigates                      Inquires                      Active participant

  Evaluating: Classroom Roles for Evaluating

TEACHERS ROLE STUDENTS ROLE
                      Clarifies                      Accepts                      Guides                         Judges                      Disputes                      Compares                      Critiques                      Questions                      Argues                      Assesses                      Decides                      Selects                       Justifies                      Active participant

 Creating: Classroom Roles for Creating

TEACHERS ROLE STUDENTS ROLE
                      Facilitates                      Extends                       Reflects                      Analyses                      Evaluates                        Designs                      Formulates                      Plans                      Takes risks                      Modifies                      Creates                      Proposes                      Active participant

  “What children learn depends not only on what they are taught but also how they are taught, their development level, and their interests and experiences…. These beliefs require that much closer attention be paid to the methods chosen for presenting material…” – Understanding the Common Essential Learnings, Saskatchewan Education, 1988. (p.10) 

Web 2.0 allows for engaged, collaborative learning, within which learners are able to access environments, tools and resources (including form other learners) at their own pace, in their own time and from wherever they may be. This empowers learners with responsibility for their own learning, so the Web 2.0 applications often act as catalysts for authentic learning experiences. Ultimately, the implication of Web 2.0 offers new possibilities for teacher professional development, student engagement and meaningful school-community integration.  

EXAM QUESTION 1

Filed under: Uncategorized — melanie1987 @ 9:53p11

 Question 1

We have developed a Learning project using Web 2.0 Technologies. This was a project that we (Melissa, Rhiannon and myself) have put together for a group of 4 year 12 Advanced English students and their parents to work ion collaboratively.

(more…)

CHILDREN AND THE INTERNET… WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

Filed under: ASSESSMENT — melanie1987 @ 9:53p11

 

The Internet can be a wonderful resource for kids. They can use it to research school reports, communicate with teachers and other kids, and play interactive games. Any child who is old enough to punch in a few letters on the keyboard can literally access the world.But that access can also pose hazards to your children. For example, your 8-year-old might log on to a search engine and type in the word “Lego.” But with just one missed keystroke, he or she might enter the word “Legs” instead, and be directed to thousands of websites with a focus on legs – some of which may contain pornographic material.That’s why it’s important to be aware of what your children see and hear on the Internet, who they meet, and what they share about themselves online. Just like any safety issue, it’s a good idea to talk with your kids about your concerns, take advantage of resources to protect them from potential dangers, and keep a close eye on their activities.

 Internet Safety Laws

A federal law has been created to help protect your kids while they are using the Internet. It is designed to keep anyone from obtaining your kids’ personal information without you knowing about it and agreeing to it first.The Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) requires websites to explain their privacy policies on the site and get parents’ consent before collecting or using a child’s personal information, such as a name, address, phone number, or social security number. The law also prohibits a site from requiring a child to provide more personal information than necessary to play a game or contest.But even with this law, your child’s best online protection is you. By talking to your child about potential online dangers and monitoring his or her computer use, you’ll be helping your child to surf the Internet safely.

Online Tools to Protect Your Child

There are online tools that you can use to control your child’s access to adult material and help protect your child from Internet predators. No option is going to guarantee that your child will be kept away from 100% of the risks on the Internet. So it’s important that you be aware of your child’s computer activity and educate your child about the online risks.Many Internet service providers (ISPs) provide parent-control options to block certain material from coming in to your child’s computer. There is also software that can help block your child’s access to certain sites based on a “bad site” list that your ISP creates. Filtering programs can block sites from coming in and restrict your child’s personal information from being sent online. You can also find programs to monitor and track your child’s online activity. Also, it’s a good idea to create a screen name for your child to protect his or her real identity.

Getting Involved in Your Child’s Online Activities

Aside from these tools, it’s a good idea to take an active role in protecting your child from Internet predators and sexually explicit materials that are online. Here are some steps that can help you do that:

·         Become computer literate and learn how to block objectionable material.·         Keep the computer in a common area, not in individual bedrooms, where you can watch and monitor your child.·         Share an email account with your child so you can monitor messages.·         Bookmark your child’s favorite sites for easy access.·         Spend time online together to teach your child appropriate online behavior.·         Forbid your child from entering private chat rooms; block them with safety features provided by your Internet service provider or with special filtering software. Be aware that posting messages to chat rooms reveals your child’s email address to others.·         Monitor your credit card and phone bills for unfamiliar account charges.·         Find out what, if any, online protection is offered by your child’s school, after-school center, friends’ homes, or any place where he or she could use a computer without your supervision.·         Take your child seriously if he or she reports an uncomfortable online exchange.·         Forward copies of obscene or threatening messages you or your child receives to your Internet service provider. ·         Call the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children at (800) 843-5678 if you are aware of the transmission, use, or viewing of child pornography online. Contact your local law enforcement agency or the FBI if your child has received child pornography via the Internet.

Many sites use “cookies,” devices that track specific information about the user, such as name, email address, and shopping preferences. Cookies can be disabled. Ask your Internet service provider for more information.It’s also a good idea to set up some simple rules for your kids to follow while they’re using the Internet. These rules may include: ·         Follow the rules you set, as well as those set by your Internet service provider. ·         Never trade personal photographs in the mail or scanned photographs over the Internet. ·         Never reveal personal information, such as address, phone number, or school name or location. Use only a screen name. Never agree to meet anyone from a chat room in person. ·         Never respond to a threatening email or message. ·         Always tell a parent about any communication or conversation that was scary. ·         If your child has a new “friend,” insist on being “introduced” online to that friend.

Chat Room Caution

A chat room is a virtual online room where a chat session takes place. Chat rooms are set up according to interest or subject, such as skiing or a favorite TV show. Because people can communicate to each other alone or in a group, chat rooms are among the most popular destinations on the Web – especially for kids and teens.But there are hazards to chat rooms for kids. There have been incidents where kids met “friends” who were interested in exploiting them through chat rooms. No one knows how common chat-room predators are, but pedophiles (adults who are sexually interested in children) are known to frequent chat rooms.These predators sometimes prod their online acquaintances to exchange personal information, such as addresses and phone numbers, thus putting the kids they are chatting with – and their families – at risk.Many pedophiles pose as teenagers in chat rooms. Because many kids have been told by parents not to give out their home phone numbers, pedophiles may encourage kids to call them; with caller id, the offenders instantly have the kids’ phone numbers.

Warning Signs That Your Child May Be a Victim

There are warning signs that your child is being targeted by an online predator. Your child may be spending long hours online, especially at night. If there are phone calls from people you don’t know or unsolicited gifts arriving in the mail, it’s a good idea to ask your child about any Internet contacts. If your child suddenly turns off the computer when you walk into the room, ask why and monitor computer time more closely. Withdrawal from family life and reluctance to discuss online activities are other signs that you need to look more closely at what your child is doing online.Contact your local law enforcement agency or the FBI if your child has received child pornography via the Internet or if your child has been the victim of a computer sex offender.By taking an active role in your child’s Internet activities, you’ll be ensuring that he or she can benefit from the wealth of valuable information the Internet has to offer, without being exposed to any potential dangers. 

stUTCp31UTC10bUTCWed, 31 Oct 2007 15:12:50 +0000 13, 2007

ESSAY (WORD COUNT 1501)

Filed under: Uncategorized — melanie1987 @ 9:53p10

Web 2.0 is essentially an increasing range of software hat supports a variety of technologies for open and collaborative communication, learning and creativity. Discuss 

Students who sit in boring classes where their brains are screaming out for stimulation and dying from tedium will create their own stimuli. That’s when the spit balls will start flying, the bits of rubber will be flicked around the room, the notes will be passed and interference with other students will begin to occur. To harness this creativity and collaboration teachers need to get on board with the digital classroom and implement Web 2.0 applications. This new technology allows for a more open and collaborative classroom where communication, learning and creativity occur. This essay will explain the role and application of Web 2.0 in schools in accordance with behavioural and cognitive learning theories, plus explain how such technology allows for creative, learning community.  

Learning and teaching in the classroom is becoming increasingly easier due to the influx of many new technologies and a myriad of software. Web 2.0 is seen as the new and improved, second generation of internet usage; Web 1.0 is the first generation. No longer is web work based upon getting information form the web; now Web 2.0 is about constructing knowledge collaboratively on the web. Web 2.0 is engaging and active compared to the passive and un-engaging Web 1.0 applications- ideal for the digital classroom. Made possible through advancements in technology, Web 2.0 applications (Facebook, MySpace, Blogs, Wiki’s, iGoogle, Flickr, RSS Feeds and YouTube. Etc) are effective teaching and pedagogical tools. These provide a platform for social networking through a medium that allows for sharing, informing, communicating and interacting.

Effective ICT use goes hand in hand with a deep understanding of learning theories and the various factors that make learning a unique experience for each individual. Web 2.0 technologies provide a useful set of tools for achieving cooperative and collaborative learning, and it recognises the value of encouraging learners to actively construct their own learning and meaning.  The way learners interact with ICT has changed over time (and is sure to continue), reflecting different learning theories in action. Early use of computer in the classroom tended to be restricted to drill and practice applications or word processing (WEB 1.0). Rapid developments in Internet and Web usages, and a relative improvement in teachers’ and students’ skill levels in using ICT applications, has resulted in an increase in creative and interactive, internet-based activities, web-page design and electronic publishing and podcasting. Each of these ICT uses has its merit, depending on the goals of the learning experience, and each is informed by current learning theories.

Web 2.0 plays a significant role in promoting cognitive learning principles in the classrooms. Cognitive theorists such as Piaget emphasised active problem solving and meaning-making on the part of the learner. Piaget and Vygotsky pointed out the importance of social interaction in learning. One of the key characteristics of Web 2.0 is collaboration, both between machine and user, and between several users. These applications have the capacity to function as ‘intellectual partners’ to promote critical thinking and higher order cognitive processing (Voithofer, 2007). Text, voice, music, graphics, photos, animation and video are combined to promote thinking and encourage learners to accomplish creative, higher-level tasks. They provide a range of resources for students to use in problem solving, thinking, reflecting and collaborating with others within physical classrooms and across the globe in virtual learning contexts.  It is also argued that Web 2.0 technologies, with their potential for interactivity, are more conducive to active and engage learning than more traditional-centred approaches. According to its advocates, the constructivist classroom that integrates Web 2.0 provides students with a ‘complex laboratory in which to observe, question, practise and validate knowledge’ (Dillon, 2004). In such classrooms, the emphasis is on learning with, not from or about, Web 2.0.

Collaboration among learners is another defining characteristic of constructivist classrooms (Jonassen, 1994). Web 2.0 has strong potential for social interactivity and for supporting collaboration and student-centred learning. For example, it is possible for virtual communities of learners on the internet to work in small collaborative groups to achieve a common goal; this is achieved through the implementation of a wiki. The heterogeneous grouping of learners around computer based tasks can assist in creating zones of proximal development and be beneficial for all students (Vygotsky, 1934). Such Web 2.0 technologies provide opportunities for students to build shared meaning (Dillon, 2004).

With its potential for addressing the needs of students on an individual basis, Web 2.0 can be particularly useful for catering to student’s individual learning styles, accordance with Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences (Gardner, 1983). Web 2.0 applications allow for a use of multiple multimedia- audio, visual and linguistics- all content based activities that allow students to perceive, transform and modify concepts so as to develop a shared meaning and understanding. The main drawcard of Web 2.0 is the inclusion of both the intrapersonal domain (individual learning through the blog) and interpersonal domain (collaborative learning through the group wiki).

The use of ICT in classrooms has been found to enhance motivation and self-esteem; this can be put down to the active engagement of learners, where self-regulation and control over learning are encouraged by the teacher, peers (and parents). This ‘non-intervention’ process allows learning to occur naturally and progressively through co-operation, and is modelled upon Glasser ‘s(1992) and Roger’s (1989)model of classroom management where students need area met and good behaviour ensues – a need for belonging, power, freedom, fun. All these ‘basic needs’ are addressed throughout Web 2.0 applications where the children have ‘responsibility and self-direction’ of their self- constructed (fun) learning (Glasser, 1992).

 ICTs have the capacity to transform learning, teaching and communication in educational settings. The key to success, however, is how the technologies are used. There are five main applications of Web 2.0 technologies, and these allow for open, collaborative and creative learning; 

·         BLOGGING

Perhaps the most powerful Internet tool is the blog, an online journal that is continuously updated by its author or authors. Blogs are Web sites that facilitate instantaneous publication and allow for feedback from readers. They’ve been used to form professional development communities, both within one school and across continents. Within the classroom, a blog may aid in brainstorming generating discussion, and also as a diary for students to critically reflect on teaching and learning.

·         WIKIS

A wiki is a communal, subject-specific Web site where users are free to add and/or edit content. When it comes to Internet-based collaboration, there’s nothing easier to use. In schools, wikis enable groups of students (parents), teachers, or both to gather content and share written work.

·         SOCIAL NETWROKING

These are often called “social content-sharing sites,” the most notable being MySpace and Facebook, where members create profiles, network, and share opinions, photos, and audio-visual content.  Both can act as a classroom tool for a classroom community. As it can be employed as an effective pedagogical tool (consider Constructivist Learning). Teachers can use sites like MySpace or Facebook as a tool for developing a sense of community with students where everyone feels free to contribute (consider Glasser’s Reality therapy Theory). Both Myspace and Facebook allow for multi-tasking, as they are both highly organized and highly structured. There is nothing more boring for students then sitting at their desks writing pages of notes, at least this way there is an opportunity for engagement and excitement.

·         SOCIAL BOOKMARKING  

Through social bookmarking, web users share their sources of information by allowing anyone to copy their RSS feeds. Folksonomic tagging is then intended to make a body of information increasingly easy to search, discover, and navigate over time. For instance, Del.icio.us is a social bookmarking site; the primary use of del.icio.us is to store your favourites/bookmarks online, which allows you to access the same bookmarks from any computer and add bookmarks from anywhere, too. It also allows for social networking so one is able to view/share networked friend’s favorite sites as well. For a classroom environment, del.icio.us is recommended because it acts as a link-log for research and through collaboration it is a much more efficient and effective search engine.  

·         PODCASTING

Podcasting enables Web sites to provide visitors with audio and/or video recordings that can be listened to and watched at any time. There are about as many social networking sites as there are interests, and among favorites are podcasting Flickr (and subsequently Photobucket), where photographs are posted and shared, and the video-sharing site YouTube (and subsequently TeacherTube). Again, like most other Web 2.0 programs, these applications work on a share principle, and when used in the design of lessons they promote and build visual literacy skills in students. 

Web 2.0 allows for engaged, collaborative learning, within which learners are able to access environments, tools and resources (including form other learners) at their own pace, in their own time and from wherever they may be. This empowers learners with responsibility for their own learning, so the Web 2.0 applications often act as catalysts for authentic learning experiences. Ultimately, the implication of Web 2.0 offers new possibilities for teacher professional development, student engagement and meaningful school-community integration.

REFERENCES

thUTCp31UTC10bUTCWed, 24 Oct 2007 23:08:41 +0000 13, 2007

GOOGLE

Filed under: Uncategorized — melanie1987 @ 9:53p10

semantic web…. 8years in the making

when searching the web- searches meaning

when google searches the web- searches words

google is controling the web, by personalising their web page

thUTCp31UTC10bUTCFri, 05 Oct 2007 01:08:45 +0000 13, 2007

SHIFT HAPPENS

Filed under: LECTURE 7 — melanie1987 @ 9:53p10

whether we like it or not, shift happens…

so we can either move forwrad with this new technological world which is web 2.0, or continue to lag in web1.0 ideas???

rdUTCp31UTC10bUTCWed, 03 Oct 2007 03:10:22 +0000 13, 2007

OUR WIKI TASK

Filed under: Uncategorized — melanie1987 @ 9:53p10

The following are six general approaches for how wikis could be implemented around schools.

Approach 1: Student Journaling
Instructors want students to journal for a number of reasons: to demonstrate writing proficiency, to expose understanding (and misunderstanding) of conceptual knowledge, to establish the habit of regular reflection, and to engage in meta-cognitive reflection, to name a few. The wiki allows students to journal for their own benefit, or for peer or instructor review.

Approach 2: Personal Portfolios
By enabling students to collect and organise digital assets such as class notes, images, Web resources, and PowerPoint slides, the wiki can help learners to make connections between and among those assets.

Approach 3: Collaborative Knowledge Base
In the more classic use of the wiki, groups can use the environment to create a shared knowledge base of information. This can be used to allow students to develop a project in small groups, to work on a small piece of a larger class project, or even to have students themselves create and maintain the course Web site.

Approach 4: Research Coordination and Collaboration
The wiki allows multiple collaborators who are separated by physical space to collect ideas, papers, timelines, documents, datasets, and study results into a collective digital space. Researchers can also use the space to store draft files for their papers: MS Word, LaTEX, or even writing directly into the Web pages of the wiki. Additionally, funders and junior researchers can be given “read only” access to all or certain parts of the space.

Approach 5: Curricular and Cross-Disciplinary Coordination
As departments become increasingly creative in their efforts to accommodate more students in a distributed/blended learning environment, curricular coordination among faculty and T.A.s gets increasingly important. The wiki allows for departmental personnel, instructors, and teaching assistants to organize common course assets, such as syllabi, office hours, and assessments, without having an endless email chain or difficult to schedule face-to-face meetings.

Approach 6: Conference and Colloquia Web Site/Coordination
Many departments, schools, and scholarly centers at the university have academic conferences and colloquia. By allowing presenters and attendees access to add and edit content, the conference wiki can serve as a resource before, during, and after the event itself. The wiki can also be used by conference administrators as a means of organizing the event.

Of course, there are many other ways to use the wiki in an academic setting.

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

so…..

Having successfully mastered the various web 2.0 technologies, and have already had the experience of working collaboratively, we were now set the challenge of designing a project for a group of 4 students to work on collaboratively.

Through our study we have already looked at the main issues and themes that emerged when using web 2.0 technologies (see below); and we will need to keep these in mind when constructing a Learner Project designed to incorporate as many as possible.

1. How are students motivated to be engaged in this kind of learning?
2. Is the collaboration being done in a way that requires all to contribute equally?
3. Does this web 2.0 technology really add educational value and improve learning?
4. How do students effectively communicate when working together using web 2.0?
5. What happens to students who do not have access, or the skills to use the web 2.0 applications?
6. How reliable is the information, what should be used and how private should it be?

In order to create this Learning Project we are required to follow a structured approach (scaffold of learning)

• Review articles and research on leading minds in the field of Web 2.0 technologies – minimum 5 works [http://www.cs.tcd.ie/Sara.Bradshaw/portfolio/research/respaper.doc]
• Clearly identify your topic – must be your teaching major, and choose appropriate syllabus dot points
• Research Hattie’s Characteristics of an Expert Teacher, and attempt to meet this criteria in your group project http://www.acer.edu.au/documents/RC2003_Hattie_TeachersMakeADifference.pdf
• Research Bloom’s Taxonomy – Newer Version, and make sure you are operating at the higher order of thinking http://projects.coe.uga.edu/epltt/index.php?title=Bloom%27s_Taxonomy
• Research Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences, and make sure you are catering for a variety of learning styles http://www.tecweb.org/styles/gardner.html
• Make sure you are following the developing the lesson scaffolding (keeping in mind Piaget, Vygotsky, Glasser, Reikurs, Cantor, Skinner, Bloom and Gardner’s theories and methods)
• Need to also consider the motivations of learning, and the factors upon which they depend
• MUST include a variety of Web 2.0 technologies through which the students (and PARENTS must play a integral role in the task) will be able to learn collaboratively

This task follows the premise: WE LEARN BEST WHEN TEACHING OTHERS

thUTCp30UTC09bUTCThu, 13 Sep 2007 11:54:16 +0000 13, 2007

ADVANTAGES VS. DISADVANTAGES OF WEB 2.0

Filed under: Uncategorized — melanie1987 @ 9:53p09

This slideshow aims to highlight the role web 2.0 technologies have in the classroom.Web 2.0 allows people to work collaboratively, so that they are able to get actively involved in creating the content they are learning. The user is able to contol his/her personal data and onformation.The slides aim to highlights the pro’s and con’s for using web 2.0 technologies in the classroom- the advantages totally outweigh the disadvantages!By looking at specific examples: blogs, wikis, RSS, social bookmarking we are able to see the fundamental place web 2.0 has in our required teaching methods.

ANIMOTO

Filed under: Uncategorized — melanie1987 @ 9:53p09

This is for the truly adventurous with lots of time to spare for creating the most wonderful lessons….

Animoto is a new mashup tool that lets you create a video from your images and music. The service overall could be likened to a slide show creator, but what animoto has done is incorporate a patent-pending artificial intelligence technology to offer something a bit more unique. Mimicking tools that are used by professional directors and editors, Animoto will consider the images and music that you’ve submitted for the creation of a video ‘mashup’. The end result will be more like a movie trailer than a regular slideshow. Others in this realm include Photobucket, Eyespot, which has recently launched a media platform for advertisers, and Fliptrack.This Web 2.0 application is a great tool for collaborative learning through which the students (and teacher) could make their own movie clips suitable to their learning and study. This could be a great exercise in class or even a large assignment they could take home where together students are to research a topic and make a movie in its regard.

WEB 2.0 WHAT IS IT & HOW CAN IT APPLY TO TEACHING AND THE TEACHER

Filed under: Uncategorized — melanie1987 @ 9:53p09

Online communication can provide:
 flexibility of access anywhere, anytime
 student interaction
 enhancement and complements face to face educational activities
 prompt and efficient feedback
 sharing of information including electronic files
 a sense of group community among students.
 group task accomplishment
 collaborative learning and problem-solving
 peer review and tutoring
 opportunities for critical and creative thinking
 opportunities to develop written communication skills

THE EVOLUTION OF WEB 2.0

Filed under: Uncategorized — melanie1987 @ 9:53p09

The slideshow aims to highlight the key differences between web1.0 applications compared to web 2.0 applications, plus the evolution and advantages of the two.“web 2.0 is people”- what more can I say!?!

SCHOOL LEARNING GOES WEB 2.0

Filed under: Uncategorized — melanie1987 @ 9:53p09

The new “social Web” or Web 2.0 is gradually having an impact in schools as teachers and students begin to explore the potential of social networking, blogs, shared online features and wikis.  These technologies are giving rise to new educational opportunities – social collaborative learning. As time goes on, teachers are increasingly becoming familiarized with these new technologies and are using blogs and wikis more and more.

Filed under: Uncategorized — melanie1987 @ 9:53p09

WEB 2.0 FOR TEACHERS- HELPING TO CREATE 21ST CENTURY SCHOOLS

Filed under: Uncategorized — melanie1987 @ 9:53p09

I AM A WEB 2.0 WORKER

Filed under: Uncategorized — melanie1987 @ 9:53p09

The presentation compares the worker 1.0 with a worker 2.0, highlighting the benefits of working with WEB 2.0 (both in the classroom environment and the real world).

It also suggests the creativity of its nature, how innovative it is and the need to be intellectually present when contributing, because authority comes from knowledge rather than power when using Web 2.0 as a community.

Web 2.0 applications have ensured awareness, engagement, sharing and learning amongst co-workers, students, friends and colleagues.

Stephen Collins from ‘AcidLabs’ has implemented and incorporated photographs from a variety of public photo sites- iStockphoto.com, LuckyOliver.com and Flickr.com- all of which I hope to implement in my teaching.

BACK TO SCHOOL WITH THE CLASS OF WEB 2.0

Filed under: Uncategorized — melanie1987 @ 9:53p09

“Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0″ – Brian Benzinger    A total collection of all the software of Web 2.0 With the start of the new school year, many teachers and students are seeking new products and technologies to help them through their upcoming academics. With the increase of teachers using blogs and wikis, and students networking and utilizing online tools, the demand for easier and more efficient ways of learning is on the rise. To me, the growing interest for web-based learning is amazing, which brought me to thinking; what if I were to consolidate some of the helpful online products and services that can help students, teachers and administrators alike? Well, I convinced myself. The following is a compilation of Web 2.0 products that I’ve personally researched and tested. These services are grouped into two main categories: “Tools”; and “Office ApplicationsR21;. Some more specific services include: organizers, grade books , research tools, document managers, diagrams, and more. There are going to be three parts to the “Back to School with the Class of Web 2.0″ series:

  • part one covering tools

http://www.solutionwatch.com/512/back-to-school-with-the-class-of-web-20-part-1/ 

  • part two covering office applications

http://www.solutionwatch.com/515/back-to-school-with-the-class-of-web-20-part-2/

  • part three, real cases of Web 2.0 used in classrooms around the world.

http://www.solutionwatch.com/519/back-to-school-with-the-class-of-web-20-part-3/ I hope that this series becomes a valuable resource for students, teachers, and school administrators alike.  

WEB 2.0 IMAGINE THE POSSIBILITIES

Filed under: Uncategorized — melanie1987 @ 9:53p09

thUTCp30UTC09bUTCThu, 06 Sep 2007 03:22:05 +0000 13, 2007

THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY – JOURNAL ARTICLE

Filed under: LECTURE 7 — melanie1987 @ 9:53p09

Role of Technology Del Stover

From tools to skills, how can students navigate today’s virtual world?  

The article discusses the significant role of educational technology in the professional and personal lives of students. Ken Kay, president of the Partnership for 21st Century Skills, looks at how students will use information and communications technology (ICT) skills in relationship to technology as workers and citizens in the global economy. Barbara Means, director of the Center for Technology in Learning at SRI International, cites the obstacles policymakers face in creating a technologically-adept classroom. The article also assesses the effectiveness of the E-Rate program in enhancing a school’s ability to access the Internet and other telecommunications outlet. 

http://search.ebscohost.com.ipacez.nd.edu.au/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=26215146&site=ehost-live

  

*** WE GET ALL OUR CONTENT OFF THE WEB. BUT WE ARE ACADEMICS. THIS MEANS WE MUST BASE OUR IDEAS ON SOLID RESEARCH, PUBLISHED IN JOURNALS AND PEER REVIEWED.

 

…………………………………………………………………………………..

 

HEY JUDE BLOG

Filed under: LECTURE 6 — melanie1987 @ 9:53p09

 If you are just beginning your adventure into Web 2.0 e-learning, then this blog is for you!The hey jude blog provides fortunate dicsoveries about web 2.0…………

The link to ‘Web2.0 notes’ provide an introduction to the Read/Write web, covering key information, tips, tricks and links to help you enjoy your journey into Web 2.0 e-learning in your school.

 

1.      Blogging

Perhaps the most powerful Internet tool is the Weblog, or blog, an online journal that is continuously updated by its author or authors. Blogs are Web sites that facilitate instantaneous publication and allow for feedback from readers. They’ve been used to form professional development communities, both within one school and across continents. Catch up wtih the trend that is sweeping the world of online learning: the use of Blogs K-12.

2.      RSS

Real Simple Syndication refers to what are called “feeds”: programs that take content from various Web sources—news sites, blogs, online journals—and deliver it in summarized form to the Web user. RSS is “the new killer application for educators” because it enables them to collect specific data without having to sift through innumerable Web and print pages.

3.      Wikis

A wiki is a communal, subject-specific Web site where users are free to add and/or edit content. When it comes to Internet-based collaboration, there’s nothing easier to use. In schools, wikis enable groups of students (parents), teachers, or both to gather content and share written work. Some classes create their own textbooks and resource sites. Take a look at Wikis and plan how you can use them for learning and teaching, for projects, professional development, or library resources.

4.      Social Bookmarks

Through social bookmarking, Web users share their sources of information by allowing anyone to copy their RSS feeds. So an educator, no matter how unfamiliar he or she is with online technology, can easily archive. This allows students and teachers to build Internet resource pages they can share and pass on to future classes.

5.      Podcasting

Podcasting enables Web sites to provide visitors with audio and/or video recordings that can be listened to and watched at any time.

6.      Social Networking Sites

These are often called “social content-sharing sites,” the most notable being MySpace.com, where members create profiles, network, and share opinions, photos, and audio-visual content. But there are about as many social networking sites as there are interests, and among favorites are Flickr.com, where photographs are posted and shared, and the video-sharing site YouTube.com. Discover how to organise online resources for yourself, your colleagues and your students – and save time! As an educator and information professional creator of the HeyJude Blog, Judy O’Connell, was fascinated by emerging technologies, the development of Web 2.0, and what this all means for schools and school libraries.This blog was created specifically to help her (and us her avid redaers/subscribers) to engage in reflection, learning and social networking on a global scale- if you don’t believe me, check out how many hits her blog has received from around the world and her blog stats 43000 hits!!! Not bad for a days work!

 

 Visit Heyjude to join the conversation online.

ndUTCp31UTC08bUTCWed, 22 Aug 2007 23:21:02 +0000 13, 2007

ACADEMIC THEORY ON WEB 2.0

Filed under: LECTURE 5 — melanie1987 @ 9:53p08

Several academics and educators from around the world have been applying Web 2.0 technology into their lessons, thus creating a digital classroom of the future.

1.http://books.google.com/books?id=RRLryxmw8icC&dq=WEB+2.0+%2B+TEACHING

Web-Teaching: A Guide for Designing Interactive Teaching for the World Wide Web –  By David W. Brooks, Diane E. Nolan, Susan M. Gallagher

Beginning with a brief history of the Internet, this book delves into a review of current research, active learning strategies, Web courseware, meta-cognition, strategies for Web discussions, promoting student self-regulation, building interactive Web pages, basic HTML coding, managing Web sites, using databases, automated testing, and security and legal issues. Experience shows that Web teaching may be used in an extremely wide range of subject areas. Therefore, allowing instructors to focus on instructional design and improving student experiences instead of only the technical skills of building Web sites. Web-Teaching helps readers pick and choose what aspects of the Web to employ to achieve the greatest student learning gains (ie. Facebook, Blogs, wiki). This academic source is a very thorough and detailed analysis of the application of Web 2.0 in the classroom.  

2. http://www.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/erm0621.pdf

Web2.0 A new wave of Innovation for Teaching and Learning – By Brian Alexander

Alexander’s article looks at the key concepts in Web 2.0 analysing its impact on the education system as a social software. For instance, it outlines the use and application of several practices and procedures that could be used as pedagogical tools within the digital classroom. For instance, Social Bookmarking, Del.icio.us, Wiki, Socialtext, Blogger – All allow for opportunities of collaboration and sharing within the lesson. He accounts for the growing services and applications, partly because of the changing face of education in this new age.  

BLOGGING IN THE CLASSROOM

Filed under: ASSESSMENT — melanie1987 @ 9:53p08

Download Video: Posted by rachelboyd at TeacherTube.com

SO WHY LET OUR STUDENTS BLOG?

  1. For communicationchildren-blogging-for-their-futures.jpg

  2. For literacy

  3. For ownership

  4. For sharing

  5. For collaboration

  6. For discussion

  7. For empowerment

  8. For interaction

  9. For motivation

  10. For participation

  11. For engagement

  12. For excitement

  13. For conversation

  14. For creativity

  15. For reflection

 To extend the walls of the classroom 

To give the students a voice

To give the students an audience

To give the students a learning environment 

To give the students skills useful for their DIGITAL FUTURES 

WRITE TO LEARN… BLOG TO LEARN

BLOG VS. WIKI

Filed under: LECTURE 4 — melanie1987 @ 9:53p08

The main difference between a blog and a wiki is the contributor. For instance, a blog is personal, with little collaboration and the posting is owned by the poster. Whereas a wiki can be personal, but is open to collaboration (access via password). Any information can be changed or deleted by anyone.

Within the classroom, the open style of a wiki can be useful for group projects, while a blog may aid in brainstorming or generating discussion. Also, a combination of the two may best suit educational purposes. Because a wiki can limit which users can login and edit the content, facilitator control can virtually be the same as a blog, where comments and posts can be pre-screened.

The main difference, then, between a wiki and a blog becomes the layout and organization of information. A wiki becomes a continually modifiable easy-access web page, while a blog’s journalistic style catalogs and dates content so readers can see the interchange of ideas related to the blog topic in question.

(Just an observation to pass along – setting up this blog has been many times more difficult than setting up my first wiki.) Blogs seem to be most effective when individuals have to research and reflect their own opinion and understanding on the research. (For example, this educational blog is designed to look at the application and implication of Web 2.0 and collaborative networked learning in the classroom). 

Wikis are best when you want multiple people to have full editing capabilities on the documents in question. www.wikipedia.com is of course the best example of a good wiki use. Plus check out my university wiki www.soymocha.pbwiki.com

The Wiki will be really useful and productive on our next practicum, that’s for sure. They are a perfect tool for group projects, communication and discussion! (with collaboration by students and fellow teachers)

Easy and educational = Perfect for the digital classroom

DEL.ICIO.US IN THE CLASSROOM

Filed under: LECTURE 5 — melanie1987 @ 9:53p08

delicious.pngWhat is del.icio.us?

del.icio.us is a collection of favourites – yours and everyone else’s. You can use del.icio.us to:

  • Keep links to your favourite articles, blogs, music, reviews, recipes, and more, and access them from any computer on the web.
  • Share favourites with friends, family, coworkers, and the del.icio.us community.
  • Discover new things. Everything on del.icio.us is someone’s favourite — they’ve already done the work of finding it. So del.icio.us is full of bookmarks about technology, entertainment, useful information, and more. Explore and enjoy.  

del.icio.us is a social bookmarking website — the primary use of del.icio.us is to store your bookmarks online, which allows you to access the same bookmarks from any computer and add bookmarks from anywhere, too. On del.icio.us, you can use tags to organize and remember your bookmarks, which is a much more flexible system than folders.

You can also use del.icio.us to see the interesting links that your friends and other people bookmark, and share links with them in return. You can even browse and search del.icio.us to discover the cool and useful bookmarks that everyone else has saved — which is made easy with tags.

What can I use del.icio.us for in the classroom?

del.icio.us is an open-ended system, so you decide how you want to use it. Here are examples of things you can do with saving bookmarks on del.icio.us:

  • Research – Writing an article? Researching an individual? Use del.icio.us to keep track of all the source materials and commentary that you find online. 
  • Podcast – Want to hear some great podcasts?  Want to post their own podcasts?
  • Linklog – Save bookmarks to interesting websites and add a bit of commentary to create a lightweight link-log. This would be great use in a classroom, where the teacher having already completed the research can post all the great sites and offer the students a blurb on each.
  • Collaboration – Friends, coworkers, school classes, and other groups can use a shared account, special tag, or their del.icio.us networks to collect and organize bookmarks that are relevant — and useful — to the entire group.   

del.icio.us has several advantages:

  1. you can get to your bookmarks from anywhere, no matter whether you’re at home, at work, in a library, or on a friend’s computer.
  2. you can share your bookmarks publicly, so your friends, coworkers, and other people can view them for reference, amusement, collaboration, or anything else. (Note that you can also mark bookmarks on del.icio.us as private — only viewable by you — if you like.)
  3. you can find other people on del.icio.us who have interesting bookmarks and add their links to your own collection.

    Here is a link to my del.icio.us book mark page (naturally linking back to this blog)

    http://del.icio.us/mhicks1987

Check out my favourite bookmarks at my del.icio.us

DIGITAL CHALKIE IN THE CLASSROOM

Filed under: LECTURE 3 — melanie1987 @ 9:53p08

Digital Chalkie is a Group Blog for Australian educators using ICTs to engage and facilitate best practice educational outcomes for their students. This means of collaboration assists in breaking down the barriers of distance when trying to work together… much easier than numerous emails. 

http://www.digitalchalkie.com is the ‘hub for all Australian Learning and Technology “Chalkies”(teachers), that is, an example of online discussions and collaborations through group blogs, wikis, webquests etc. This is one Web 2.0 application I will make the most of in my teaching career, as fellow teachers can provide guidance, support and feedback.  

For an example of a communal blog, visit http://digitalchalkie.wikispaces.com/ (a Web 2.0 video wiki online that consists of at least 23 videos about how networked learning is shaping the face of education)

FACEBOOK AND MYSPACE IN THE CLASSROOM

Filed under: Uncategorized — melanie1987 @ 9:53p08

Facebook, more so than Myspace, can act as a classroom tool for a classroom community. As it can be employed as an effective pedagogical tool (consider Constructivist Learning). Teachers can use sites like MySpace or Facebook as a tool for developing a sense of community with students where everyone feels free to contribute. 

Facebook would be more appropriate and safer to use in the classroom, as viewing of ones profile is set to friends only (Private). This is not the case with Myspace, where any ‘Joe-Blog’ can check out your profile. As access has to be approved, it limits the risk of predators.  

Students will be able to collaboratively and constructively work together. This Web 2.0 software allows for social networked learning and is far more creative and challenging than just word processing (Web 1.0).  

Every student has their own unique gifts and talents and these can be capitalized upon in such a unique task/application. Especially in Myspace where multimedia (youtube, podcasts, photo slides) can be applied to add a touch of colour and difference.  Students can work within their group (school peers) only, and can offer constant support and guidance to fellow students on the ‘Wall’. (The teacher can use this application as well, making comments daily on work progress etc.) 

Both Myspace and Facebook allow for multi-tasking, as they are both highly organized and highly structured. There is nothing more boring for students then sitting at their desks writing pages of notes, at least this way there is an opportunity for engagement and excitement. Just like my Networked Learning Blog!!!

REMEMBER STUDENTS LEARN:collaborative-use-of-myspace.jpg

10% of what is read

20% of what is heard

30% of what is seen

50% of what is seen and heard

70% of what is discussed with others

80% of what is experienced personally

90% of what they teach to someone

thUTCp31UTC08bUTCSat, 18 Aug 2007 09:14:37 +0000 13, 2007

FACEBOOK vs. MYSPACE

Filed under: Uncategorized — melanie1987 @ 9:53p08

logo_facebook1.jpg  vsmyspace-logo.jpg

Many users are choosing sides when it comes to two of the most popular networking Web sites today, www.Facebook.com and www.myspace.com 

Both sites aim to serve the same basic purpose: creating communities and connecting people with common interests. Registered users on both sites can benefit socially, professionally or romantically due to the availability of information on the large population of users. While this is true for both, the sites have their differences. 

FACEBOOK

MYSPACE

  • limits its registered users to those with an e-mail address belonging to one of the chosen participating schools 
  • level of security on Facebook is substantially higher, a user must be a confirmed friend in order to view a member’s profile. 
  • Facebook members also have the option to change their privacy settings to restrict certain people from viewing personal information that may be posted on one’s profile.   
  • Only now is the network growing from that of College students
  • Always loads quickly


 

  • open to anyone who wants to join, binding they are at least 16 years old. 
  • Allows users to add more than one photo (any number up to 10), whereas Facebook only displays one photo. 
  • Bands, Clubs and even TV Shows have their own Myspace 
  • MySpace members can see anyone’s profiles, communicate with a variety of people, share photos, and post journals, comments and interests. (However, Myspace now has the application of setting site to private, thus only allowing friends to view their profile) 
  • Bigger network of people.

  Although some users are members on both sites, many have a favorite among the two. “I prefer MySpace to Facebook,” said Lisa Hartman, a senior psychology major. “MySpace is better. It is more advanced. You can put videos on your page and it’s more individual. Facebook is more one-dimensional.”Darrell Flynn, a senior sociology major, belongs to MySpace and refuses to join Facebook. “MySpace is not just students, it’s a whole community,” Flynn said. “Bands and random people can join. It’s nice because of the personalization, you can really make your page your own.” In the online networking community, the personalization of one’s profile is a huge selling point.Jen Muser, a sophomore math major, says her heart belongs strictly to Facebook. “MySpace is ghetto looking. It just doesn’t look as nice as Facebook,” she said.

With the growing population on both Facebook and MySpace, it’s rare to find someone who doesn’t belong to either one.

My own personal response to Myspace and  Facebook.face-head.jpg

I found signing up to both sites quite easy, the only problem was the time it took to load all my favourite movies, music, television shows etc… but this I feel was more my indecisiveness than a problem with the software. I had already been affiliated with Myspace for the last year, having been introduced (peer pressured) into last year by friends, and needless to say I became immediately hooked. With the ability to search, message, blog and comment, plus load music, pictures and video clips – what is not to love?!? 

I was new to Facebook, and had intentionally avoided it, afraid that it would be another form of procrastination (and that it has). With the numerous application and various groups, I am finding Facebook just as addictive. However It does not allow for the personalization and creativity that Myspace does, thus targeting its older demographic. Plus I can already see the bruises piling up from all the super poking! 

In my eyes, and no doubt the other 100000+ people who have already signed up, Facebook is the new Myspace (branching out from its original targeted audience of just college students) 

MySpace now receives more daily hits than Google, and is second only to Yahoo as the Web’s busiest destination. The median age range of MySpace users is 18-24. Facebook is a similar site targeted explicitly to college students. The numbers of students who use this site on a regular basis is similarly staggering. On both sites, students compose profiles describing themselves in order to make or maintain relationships with others. Students form and join groups, reflect on their lives through blog entries, and document them by posting photographs. In both cases students are creating self-representations, seeking to convince an audience to understand themselves in a particular way. 

These technologies and associated software have enabled learning to occur as a result of connection with people and knowledge. These connections are made in real time and real life, but also in a virtual time and virtual reality.

thUTCp31UTC08bUTCFri, 17 Aug 2007 11:06:42 +0000 13, 2007

WEB 2.0 on YOUTUBE.COM

Filed under: Uncategorized — melanie1987 @ 9:53p08

LECTURE 3: The CLASSROOM OF THE FUTURE

Filed under: LECTURE 3 — melanie1987 @ 9:53p08

 The Expert Teacher (Positive Behaviours) VS. the Digital Teacher 

THE EXPERT TEACHER

THE DIGITAL TEACHER
  • Feedback

  • Prior ability

  • Instructional Quality

  • Direct Instruction

  • Remediation/feedback

  • Student Disposition

  • Class environment

  • Challenge Goals 

  • Encourages collaborative and constructivist learning

  • Moving from teacher to coach

  • Assessment becoming performance focus Encourages socialisation in a mediated space

  • Not locked down

  • Fast adoption and change encouraged

  • Get browsing to a minimum

  • Create a knowledge network through social bookworking

  • Instructional Quality varies 

How do the STUDENTS benefit from the CLASSROOM OF THE FUTURE? 

(The Millenials)

classroom-computers.jpg

  • Collaboration/teamwork

  • Experiential activities

  • Technology assumed

  • Internet better than TV

  • Results and actions, not accumulation of facts

  • Learning is trial and error (Nintendo)

  • Multitasking is a way of life

  • Typing is preferred to handwriting

  • Staying connected is essential

  • Zero tolerance for delays

  • Consumer and creator are blurring

How does SOCIETY benefit from the CLASSROOM OF THE FUTURE? 

  • “Shift Happens”

LECTURE 3: EDUCATION FOR A DIGITAL AGE

Filed under: LECTURE 3 — melanie1987 @ 9:53p08

   At Work People are:  

computer-piccie.jpg

  • Communicating

  • Team Working

  • Problem solving

  • Initiating

  • Enterprise

  • Planning

  • Organising

Young People expect 

  • Work to be interesting and fun

  • Lifestyle to be more valued than money

  • Their social lives to merge with their work lives

  • No guarantee of loyalty

They are resourceful, adaptable and flexible

 

THIS IS WHERE WEB 2.0 COMES TO THE RESCUE!!!  

thUTCp31UTC08bUTCWed, 08 Aug 2007 22:53:28 +0000 13, 2007

LECTURE 2: PB WIKI

Filed under: LECTURE 2 — melanie1987 @ 9:53p08

pb-wiki-logo.jpg

PB Wikias easy as a Peanut Butter sandwich!

 A wiki is an easy-to-use web page that multiple people can edit.

It’s like a shared whiteboard online. Don’t worry about getting IT support or installing any software. We handle all of that. You just start typing and get an online classroom in about 5 minutes.       

Why use PBwiki?

No HTML experience required. Create a syllabus, share it with your students, and let them write collaborative essays online. Create online Powerpoint-like presentations right from your wiki.      

Who else is using PBwiki?pbwiki-chart.jpg 

We host over 135,000 wikis and thousands of others have used PBwikis for their classrooms, from elementary schools to Stanford and Harvard.    

http://mrlindsay.pbwiki.com  is Mr. Lindsay’s beautiful classroom wiki, where he demos his students’ work with book reviews, poems, stories, and tons of other resources. It’s a wiki run “by the students, for the students.”  

http://cas100b.pbwiki.com  is another excellent educational wiki. You’ll note the project proposals, class notes, and different sections for different classes.  

http://epochewiki.pbwiki.com  is the Penn State English 15 course, which is required for all freshman English students at Penn State.    

PBwiki can help you engage with your audience.

PBwiki provides educators an easy way to post class room material online and gives students the ability to collaborate through the internet.  

 PBwiki is helping educators educate. http://www.teachertube.com/view_video.php?viewkey=455b3fa09a282e0d496f .

LECTURE 2: OVERVIEW OF WEB 2.0

Filed under: LECTURE 2 — melanie1987 @ 9:53p08

Overview of Web 2.0 Web 2.0 is essentially an increasing range of software that supports a variety of technologies for open and collaborative communication, learning and creativity. 

It consits of 

1. A Platform

  • This is browser based – e.g. Internet Explorer or Firefox. (Firefox is preferred because it is free and open software in a constant state of development (Web 2.0), whereas Explorer is owned and comes out in a fixed form and then has updates and upgrades on an irregular basis (Web 1.0))
  • It operates on open and collaborative principles
  • Communications are the key applications

 2. Social Networking

  • Personalised and open collaborative knowledge spaces
  • Access people as well as knowledge
  • Copyright issues exist and have to be dealt with and replaced with a Creative Commons culture
  • This is beyond the normal formalities of the classroom and can take place anywhere at any time

 3. Read/Write Web

  • People are consurmers of content and services
  • People and publishers of content and services
  • Such people are called Produsers

 4. What makes Web 2.0

  • Blogs
  • Wikis
  • Social Tagging – bookmarking, Tag Clouds
  • Sharing sites
  • Podcasts
  • Mashups
  • Aggregators
  • Ubiquitous connectivity

And Kathryn (Lecturer/Tutor) added all these others.   

FLICKR

Filed under: LECTURE 2 — melanie1987 @ 9:53p08

Flickr, the popular photo hosting service, by all accounts, seems to be the best and easiest way to store, search, sort and share your photos with the world.

 I found using the software quite easy and self-explanatory as the process

was step-by-step and clearly explained throughout.

Flickr - a source of inspiration

  1. Create an Account (thankfully already have existing Yahoo ID account)
  2. Load Pictures (again found this quite easy, only challenge was finding a decent photograph!!!)
  3. Label and Describe Pictures (this gives you an opportunity to account for your photography)
  4. DONE

 All that’s left to do is to create your profile page and photo layouts – but again, these as easy as following the prompts. Now all I need to do is find some friends and join a group or two, so I can start commenting!

*** So after all the effort I went to, I think it is only appropriate you check out my space on Flickr. http://flickr.com/photos/11117081@N05/ 

So why use Flickr in the classroom?

Use it in the design of lessons that promote and build visual literacy skills in students. A wide variety of applications to learning exist by using Flickr photography, from using single photographs as writing prompts (either creative or interpretive writing) to using multiple image sets in digital storytelling projects. Student users can also contribute to the development of online stories about images, all the while loading their own images.

I would be interested in doing things like:

  1. Getting the kids to produce a narrative with five separate shots.
  2. Asking the kids to look at different pages on Flickr to get ideas for groups and sets. Ask them to set up sets themselves which the whole class could try to contribute to.
  3. Get kids to be photographers on sports day and on trips out etc. They can then comment in captions giving recollections and memories.
  4. Get kids to be photographers showing positive images of the school to show everyday life there.
  5. Sets of photos showing a ‘typical day’ in their school life. Make comparisons. Get the kids to caption these and to comment on each others.
  6. Gather photos of current events across the world or important places that may be relevant to other classroom work.

ndUTCp31UTC08bUTCThu, 02 Aug 2007 14:10:01 +0000 13, 2007

LECTURE 1: SO WHAT IS WEB 2.0?

Filed under: LECTURE 1 — melanie1987 @ 9:53p08

Web 2.0

It is essentially an increasing range of software that supports a variety of technologies for open and collaborative communication, learning and creativity.

For instance, www.digitalchalkie.com is the ‘hub for                                         web 2.0 in a nutshell                 all Austrlian Learning and Technology “Chalkies”‘, that is, an example of online discussions and collaborations through group blogs, wikis, webcasts etc.

Web 2.0 requires:

  1. a platform                                   
  2. social networking
  3. read/write web
  4. social software
  5. gathering and sorting

 

IT BRINGS YOU WHAT YOU WANT… YOU ARE CREATING THE WORLD YOU WANT!!!

(For further information http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_2.0)

LECTURE 1: WEB 1.0 vs. WEB 2.0

Filed under: LECTURE 1 — melanie1987 @ 9:53p08

Web 1.0 is getting information from the web

Web 2.0 is constructing knowledge collaboratively on the web

Web 2.0 is the heart and soul of online education eg. podcasts, ajax, mash-up, wiki

Web 2.0 is putting the “we” in “web”

Web 2.0 … ‘the living web’

   THE BUZZWORD WEB 2.0

(For further information, refer to expert Andy Budd) http://www.andybudd.com/presentations/dcontruct05/

 

WEB 1.0

WEB 2.0

  • Double click        
  • Ofoto         
  • Mp3.com         
  • Britannica Online         
  • Personal Websites        
  • Content Mangament Systems
  • Directories (Taxonomy)        
  • Stickiness
  • Google
  • Flickr
  • Napster
  •  Wikipedia
  • Blogs
  •   Wikis
  •  Tagging (“folksonomy”)
  • Syndication

(For further information, refer to expert Tim O’Reilly)

http://www.oreillynet.com/pub/a/oreilly/tim/news/2005/09/30/what-is-web-20.html

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